Halloween II

(Collector's Edition) (1981) Jamie Lee Curtis

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Halloween

(Two-Disc Special Edition) (2007) Malcolm McDowell

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DreamWorks Halloween

Double Pack (Scared Shrekless / Monsters vs Aliens: Mutant Pumpkins From Outer Space)

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History of Halloween

The Haunted History of Halloween (History Channel) (A&E DVD Archives) (2005)

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Return to Halloweentown

(Ultimate Secret Edition) (2006) Sara Paxton

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The Day After Halloween

(Katarina's Nightmare Theater) Sigrid Thornton

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SpongeBob SquarePants

Halloween (1999) Tom Kenny

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Halloween III

Season of the Witch (1982) Tom Atkins

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Playhouse Disney Halloween

(Just Say Boo/A Spookie Ookie Halloween) (1998) Cole Caplan

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Halloween

25 Years of Terror (2006) John Ottman

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why is there halloween?

why do we have halloween whats the reason

4 Responses to why is there halloween?

  • Josh B says:

    Halloween is a very old tradition that we still celebrate. formally known as "all hallows eve." Originally passing out treats were to ward off demons from haunting houses. Here’s a cool video about it’s real meaning

  • YoYo Man C says:

    just for fun
    people like a bit of a celebration

  • lali says:

    well some poeple say its a holiday where they would celebrate the dead but i dont know if thats the real reason i looked it up and probaly found the reason but didnt get what they were saying but maybe you will so heres the website good luck!

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Halloween

  • #7 says:

    Going door-to-door begging treats in return for songs or prayers is a very old tradition in the British Isles for several different holidays, including Hallowe’en.

    For the ancient Celts Samhain, which began at sundown on the date we now call October 31, was a New Year’s Eve celebration with bonfires and both secular and religious ceremonies marking the end of summer and harvest and the beginning of the cold, dark season. It was also considered a time when the world of the living and the world of the dead would overlap for one night, and the dead could slip in and play tricks on the living, so it was a dangerous as well as a joyous time. Candles in Jack’o’Lanterns (which started out as turnips, not pumpkins) were supposed to frighten or confuse the dead, and thus guard the living from harm. People also wore masks or costumes to confuse the dead and so protect themselves from harm.

    Much later, the Catholic Church moved All Saints Day from sometime in the spring to November 1, and the night before became known as All Hallows Eve or All Souls Night. The idea that it was a night of danger was retained, and it was thought that demons as well as the dead could come back and work dark mischief on the living. Also retained was the tradition of begging for treats, and playing (sometimes really nasty) tricks on those who would not provide them.

    Today, October 31 by whatever name remains an important high religious holiday for Wiccans, Neodruids, and some other pagans. Some extremely strict Christians object to celebrating Hallowe’en at all because they associate it with Satan. In the U.S. most people have forgotten the religious aspect of the holiday almost entirely, and regard it simply as a chance to dress up in costumes, have fun, and either collect and eat way too much candy or else collect money for UNICEF. Serious tricking is rarely practiced anymore, but in Detroit and a few other cities, the night before Hallowe’en, October 30, has become known as Devil’s Night, because some people began their own nasty little tradition of looting, burning, and rioting, but police have been able to prevent or curb the worst violence for the last few years.

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