Halloween II

(Collector's Edition) (1981) Jamie Lee Curtis

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Halloween

(Two-Disc Special Edition) (2007) Malcolm McDowell

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DreamWorks Halloween

Double Pack (Scared Shrekless / Monsters vs Aliens: Mutant Pumpkins From Outer Space)

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History of Halloween

The Haunted History of Halloween (History Channel) (A&E DVD Archives) (2005)

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Return to Halloweentown

(Ultimate Secret Edition) (2006) Sara Paxton

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The Day After Halloween

(Katarina's Nightmare Theater) Sigrid Thornton

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SpongeBob SquarePants

Halloween (1999) Tom Kenny

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Halloween III

Season of the Witch (1982) Tom Atkins

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Playhouse Disney Halloween

(Just Say Boo/A Spookie Ookie Halloween) (1998) Cole Caplan

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Halloween

25 Years of Terror (2006) John Ottman

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What is the real story behind Halloween?

5 Responses to What is the real story behind Halloween?

  • ?? go gators! ?? says:

    Halloween has its origins in the ancient Celtic festival known as Samhain (Irish pronunciation: [?s?aun?]; from the Old Irish samain). The festival of Samhain is a celebration of the end of the harvest season in Gaelic culture, and is sometimes regarded as the "Celtic New Year". Traditionally, the festival was a time used by the ancient pagans to take stock of supplies and slaughter livestock for winter stores. The ancient Gaels believed that on October 31, now known as Halloween, the boundary between the alive and the deceased dissolved, and the dead become dangerous for the living by causing problems such as sickness or damaged crops. The festivals would frequently involve bonfires, into which bones of slaughtered livestock were thrown. Costumes and masks were also worn at the festivals in an attempt to mimic the evil spirits or placate them.

    History of name
    The term Halloween is shortened from All Hallows’ Even (both "even" and "eve" are abbreviations of "evening", but "Halloween" gets its "n" from "even") as it is the eve of "All Hallows’ Day",[6] which is now also known as All Saints’ Day. It was a day of religious festivities in various northern European Pagan traditions,[3] until Popes Gregory III and Gregory IV moved the old Christian feast of All Saints’ Day from May 13 (which had itself been the date of a pagan holiday, the Feast of the Lemures) to November 1. In the ninth century, the Church measured the day as starting at sunset, in accordance with the Florentine calendar. Although All Saints’ Day is now considered to occur one day after Halloween, the two holidays were, at that time, celebrated on the same day. Liturgically, the Church traditionally celebrated that day as the Vigil of All Saints, and, until 1970, a day of fasting as well. Like other vigils, it was celebrated on the previous day if it fell on a Sunday, although secular celebrations of the holiday remained on the 31st. The Vigil was suppressed in 1955, but was later restored in the post-Vatican II calendar.

    Halloween did not become a holiday in the United States until the 19th century, where lingering Puritan tradition restricted the observance of many holidays. American almanacs of the late 18th and early 19th centuries do not include Halloween in their lists of holidays. The transatlantic migration of nearly two million Irish following the Irish Potato Famine (1845-1849) finally brought the holiday to the United States. Scottish emigration, primarily to Canada before 1870 and to the United States thereafter, brought the Scottish version of the holiday to each country. The main event for children of modern Halloween in the United States and Canada is trick-or-treating, in which children disguise themselves in costumes and go door-to-door in their neighborhoods, ringing each doorbell and yelling "trick or treat!" to solicit a gift of candy or similar items.

    Scottish-American and Irish-American societies held dinners and balls that celebrated their heritages, with perhaps a recitation of Robert Burns’ poem "Halloween" or a telling of Irish legends, much as Columbus Day celebrations were more about Italian-American heritage than Columbus per se. Home parties centred on children’s activities, such as bobbing for apples, and various divination games often concerning future romance. Not surprisingly, pranks and mischief were common as well.

    At the turn of the 20th century, Halloween had turned into a night of vandalism, with destruction of property and cruelty to animals and people.[30] Around 1912, the Boy Scouts, Boys Clubs and other neighborhood organizations came together to encourage a safe celebration that would end the destruction that had become so common on this night.[31] School posters during this time called for a "Sane Halloween." Children began to go door to door, receiving treats, rather than playing tricks on their neighbors. This helped to reduce the mischief, and by the 1930s, "beggar’s nights" had become very popular. Trick-or-treating became widespread by the end of the 1930s.

  • dr_satan19 says:
  • Stephanie V says:
  • Delish says:

    Samhain-a pagan holiday celebrated in honor of the harvest, as well as honoring those who have passed.

    It’s pronounced "sow-wen."

    🙂

  • EdgeWitch says:

    In Pagan society the festivals were governed by the seasons. The New Year started with the death of the land. It is apparent that all the trees and plants etc. go into a period of dormancy at this time of year. The perception was that the vegetation and the Earth goddess were resting, after the years yield, in preparation for the regeneration-birth of the later spring. So the new year began, not with the actual birth, but the preparation and conception.
    All Hallows or All Souls was traditionally the time to honour the dead and the spirits of the year. It was believed to be one of the times when the veils between the world of spirit and the physical world ran in closest parallel. This is why many of the customs include divination and particular ritual.

    The Gaelic name for November was Samhain, this then became adopted for the Halloween festival. It is not known what it was called in other areas before the Christian church tried to quash the pagan links.

    Most of Britain and Ireland, however retained many of the old customs, despite the discouragement of the imposed church. So Halloween, Harvest and many of the customs associated with Easter (the opposite end of the year) still remain in various forms.

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