Halloween II

(Collector's Edition) (1981) Jamie Lee Curtis

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Halloween

(Two-Disc Special Edition) (2007) Malcolm McDowell

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DreamWorks Halloween

Double Pack (Scared Shrekless / Monsters vs Aliens: Mutant Pumpkins From Outer Space)

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History of Halloween

The Haunted History of Halloween (History Channel) (A&E DVD Archives) (2005)

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Return to Halloweentown

(Ultimate Secret Edition) (2006) Sara Paxton

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The Day After Halloween

(Katarina's Nightmare Theater) Sigrid Thornton

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SpongeBob SquarePants

Halloween (1999) Tom Kenny

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Halloween III

Season of the Witch (1982) Tom Atkins

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Playhouse Disney Halloween

(Just Say Boo/A Spookie Ookie Halloween) (1998) Cole Caplan

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Halloween

25 Years of Terror (2006) John Ottman

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what is the history of Halloween ?

does it have a history event or something or people just celebrate it for fun ?

6 Responses to what is the history of Halloween ?

  • Fiona says:

    Halloween (Hallowe’en, Hallowtide, Hallowmas, Allhallow-even) is short for "All Hallows Even" which means "All Saints Eve" (Hallow means holy or saintly). It is the eve before All Saints Day, a Catholic day to honor all the saints who do not already have a feast day of their own. All Saints Day was originally established in Rome by Pope Boniface IV in 609 A.D and was celebrated on May 13. It was moved to November 1 in the 8th century by Pope Gregory III. In the 10th or early 11th century A.D. All Souls Day, celebrated on November 2, was added as a day to pray for the souls in purgatory and attend a requiem mass to honor the Christian dead.

    People would visit cemeteries, decorate relatives’ graves, and leave food offerings for the dead. Pagan Roman customs may have influenced the practice of offering food to the dead. During Parentalia and Feralia, which were celebrated in February, Romans offered food and flowers at gravesites. Also, All Saints original date of May 13 coincided with the final day of Lemuria which was another festival of the dead in pre-Christian Rome.

    When All Hallows came to Ireland, the Irish did to this day what they did with the rest of their new Christian religion – combined it with their pre-Christian beliefs and turned it into something uniquely Irish. They had celebrated a feast day called Samhain, which is attested to in many sagas and historical records (these stories talk about history extending all the way back to the time of Christ, but the surviving texts are from Medieval times – although the authorship of many of the writings is earlier than the physically surviving manuscripts). I don’t know what calendar the Irish used prior to the coming of Christianity, but after its arrival Samhain was attributed to November 1. In Ireland today the holiday is called by its Catholic name in English, Halloween, and its pre-Christian name in Irish, Oiche Shamhna (November Eve or Samhain Eve). Today, Samhain is Irish for November, but that may have been due to a misunderstanding of the word Samhain, as November and the winter season were known as Gam, Gamuin, or Gamain.

    Samhain was a time for a great feast, important battles in some stories, divination, and interaction between mortals and the people of the sidhe – what would later be termed fairies, although these fairies were powerful semi-divine beings and not the little ones with wings that are popular today.

    It is difficult to trace many of the customs of Halloween to their sources because of the way cultural beliefs and customs slowly mixed and evolved over time – and in more than a few cases the lack of records, as well. Pagan customs, which were an intimate part of people’s everyday lives, devolved into folk customs, then were absorbed into the holiday, and finally were interpreted through Christian viewpoints. Several of Halloween’s symbols and traditions that are attributed to paganism actually developed long after Christianity had taken over. It is clear that many of these customs are not Christian-based as things like dressing in costumes (a custom also practiced at several other holidays, including Christmas) would not have been established by the Christian church. However, we can only trace a few customs in a direct line back to their pre-Christian predecessors. The rest is guesswork and is heavily filtered through Christian belief (the association of witches and black cats with Halloween, for example, has its origins with Christian people, not pagan – and there is no evidence that costumes were worn at Samhain).

    All Saints and All Souls celebrations in the Americas can be traced back to the arrival of the Spanish missionaries and French Jesuit missionaries in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. The Native Americans adopted these Christian traditions and combined them with their native celebrations honoring the dead. These feasts are still celebrated today; Mexico’s Day of the Dead and the Odawa’s Ghost Supper are two examples.

    In the mid-19th century there was a heavy influx of Irish and Scottish immigrants to the United States and they brought Halloween with them. At this time Halloween was more like a fun harvest festival with divination, a ‘spooky’ atmosphere, and throwing parties being central to the holiday. (Divination is one of the few customs that can be clearly traced back to pre-Christian Irish and Samhain traditions). In the 20th century the United States and Canada made several changes to the holiday:
    1) It became more of a holiday for kids
    2) Trick-or-treat came into being (although begging and costuming traditions existed for centuries before this – including for other holidays as well, Christmas included – trick or treat as we know it was invented in North America)
    3) It became commercialized, with the introduction of factory-made costumes, haunted attractions, etc.
    4) In the 1970’s the false idea that Halloween is Satanic began to be perpetuated by extremist churches and Hollywood (some anti-Catholic bias may play a part in some of these church’s motivations)
    5) It was influenced by Hollywood, especially beginning with the movie "Halloween". This is the source of murderers and ‘slashers’ being associated with Halloween.

    Today All Saints Day and All Souls Day are still celebrated as Catholic holidays in many European countries, and are even public holidays where citizens get the day/days off work and school. The same is true in Central and South America and Mexico, except there is a strong element of Native American practices mixed in with All Saints in these countries. It is also a public holiday in the Phillipines.

    In countries that celebrate the holiday under the name Halloween, the history is largely forgotten (although Ireland has maintained several older customs) and has been replaced by misinformation influenced by several factors, and religious fighting (between Protestant, Catholic, and pagan – just like Christmas).

  • imcool says:

    Halloween has origins in the ancient Celtic festival known as Samhain (Irish pronunciation: [?s?aun?]; from the Old Irish samain, apparently derived from Gaulish samonios). The festival of Samhain is a celebration of the end of the harvest season in Brythonic and Gaelic culture, and is sometimes regarded as the "Celtic New Year". Traditionally, the festival was a time used by the ancient Celtic pagans to take stock of supplies and slaughter livestock for winter stores. The ancient Celts believed that on October 31, now known as Halloween, the boundary between the living and the deceased dissolved, and the dead become dangerous for the living by causing problems such as sickness or damaged crops. The festivals would frequently involve bonfires, into which the bones of slaughtered livestock were thrown. Costumes and masks were also worn at the festivals in an attempt to copy the evil spirits or placate them.

  • Soylent says:

    There’s no quick answer to this, best bet is to read the wikipedia page on it.

    ‘"Halloween has origins in the ancient Celtic festival known as Samhain (Irish pronunciation: [?s?aun?]; from the Old Irish samain, apparently derived from Gaulish samonios). The festival of Samhain is a celebration of the end of the harvest season in Brythonic and Gaelic culture, and is sometimes regarded as the "Celtic New Year". Traditionally, the festival was a time used by the ancient Celtic pagans to take stock of supplies and slaughter livestock for winter stores. The ancient Celts believed that on October 31, now known as Halloween, the boundary between the living and the deceased dissolved, and the dead become dangerous for the living by causing problems such as sickness or damaged crops. The festivals would frequently involve bonfires, into which the bones of slaughtered livestock were thrown. Costumes and masks were also worn at the festivals in an attempt to copy the evil spirits or placate them.’

  • Doctor Brilliant says:

    Halloween started 5000 years ago in Ancient Britain by the Emperor Guiness. Halloween actually stands for "Hello, Weenie" as when the emperor just whipped it out, and it just scared the sh– out of everybody. And that’s basically it. Halloween.

  • Hh F says:

    I love this question!,
    Thousands of years ago they had i night were spirits arose for one night,
    Hallows eve on that night they believed that three witches stood round a stone table while there sister was giving birth,
    Although there sister was mortal they loved her so,
    When she gave birth to a Beautiful young boy something happened,
    She got struck by a giant force making her son and her share the powers that embedded the child,
    This field spread across the world making havoc turning people into jackalantern creatures into not magical witches and skeletons and into baby grim reapers,
    Suddenly the baby disappeared into the sky and was never seen again by anyone but 12 years later the mother felt something,
    In her chest and then,
    Her child returned from the ground and they changed the name to halloween.

    That’s why people dress up and that’s why it’s very celebrated.

  • ?ur jealous of my garden gnome?? says:

    it was started by the mexicans. or was it the irish? i cant remember

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