Halloween II

(Collector's Edition) (1981) Jamie Lee Curtis

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Halloween

(Two-Disc Special Edition) (2007) Malcolm McDowell

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DreamWorks Halloween

Double Pack (Scared Shrekless / Monsters vs Aliens: Mutant Pumpkins From Outer Space)

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History of Halloween

The Haunted History of Halloween (History Channel) (A&E DVD Archives) (2005)

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Return to Halloweentown

(Ultimate Secret Edition) (2006) Sara Paxton

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The Day After Halloween

(Katarina's Nightmare Theater) Sigrid Thornton

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SpongeBob SquarePants

Halloween (1999) Tom Kenny

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Halloween III

Season of the Witch (1982) Tom Atkins

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Playhouse Disney Halloween

(Just Say Boo/A Spookie Ookie Halloween) (1998) Cole Caplan

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Halloween

25 Years of Terror (2006) John Ottman

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What is Halloween’s History?

I’m very interested in Halloween, and not just begging for candy, but why we have it. I know it has something to do with the ancient druids and Halloween was the one night of the year spirits could come to our world or something like that. So what is it really?

4 Responses to What is Halloween’s History?

  • Fiona says:

    Halloween (Hallowe’en, Hallowtide, Hallowmas, Allhallow-even) is short for "All Hallows Even" which means "All Saints Eve". It is the eve before All Saints Day, a Catholic day to honor all the saints who do not already have a feast day of their own. All Saints Day was originally celebrated on May 13 when Pope Boniface IV rededicated the Pantheon in Rome to ‘St. Mary and All Martyrs’ in 609 A.D. It was moved to November 1 in the 8th century when Pope Gregory III dedicated St. Peter’s Basilica to all the saints . In the 10th century A.D. All Souls Day was added as a day to pray for the souls in purgatory and attend a requiem mass to honor the Christian dead.

    Folk customs surrounding All Souls are the origin of the belief that the dead come back on Halloween. People would visit cemeteries, decorate relatives’ graves, and leave food offerings for the dead. In some areas they would set a place at the table or arrange chairs around the fireplace for the returning souls of the dead. In Ireland people would also sometimes leave food for the fairies (divine or semi-divine beings who could be dangerous, and not the little creatures with wings that we think of today). Pagan Roman customs probably also influenced the practice of offering food to the dead. During Parentalia and Feralia, which were celebrated in February, Romans offered food and flowers at gravesites. Also, All Saints original date of May 13 coincided with the final day of Lemuria which was another festival of the dead in pre-Christian Rome (where All Saints originated). Lemuria involved beans as part of the rites and today a treat called "beans of the dead" is popular in Italy for All Saints.

    Samhain had an influence on Halloween in Ireland, and that is the version that turned into what we know as Halloween today. Samhain is mentioned in numerous medeival Irish sagas as a day of great importance. It was a day of feasting, games, drinking, great battles in some sagas and a peaceful feast in others, heroic feats, and interaction between mortals and the realm of the supernatural (faires, sidhe, tuatha de dannan). In Ireland the customs that are associated with Halloween are the same as the ones mentioned in the sagas as being part of Samhain: divination, partying, the belief that supernatural beings mingle with or harass humans on this night. The word ‘Samhain’ has gone through numerous changes and spellings (Samuin, Saman, Samhna) and its etymolgy is somewhat confusing. Today ‘Samhain’ is the Irish word for the month of November although it used to mean November 1 (there is some evidence that Gam was actually the Old Irish word for November). Oiche Shamnha is Irish for Halloween; it means the "eve of Samhain" or the "eve of November 1".

    All Saints and All Souls celebrations in the Americas can be traced back to the arrival of the Spanish missionaries and French Jesuit missionaries in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. The Native Americans adopted these Christian traditions and combined them with remnants of their native celebrations. These feast days are still celebrated today as Mexico’s Day of the Dead, the Zuni ahoppa awan tewa, the Odawa Ghost Supper, shuma sashti, Todos Santos, Finados, and other native celebrations.

    In the nineteenth century Irish and Scottish immigrants settled in the United States and brought their Halloween customs with them. Unlike the more solemn, purely Catholic observance of All Saints/All Souls Day typical in continental Europe, the Irish version was more of a fun harvest festival in nature. Victorian-era Americans quickly adopted this holiday as an excuse to throw parties, send greeting cards, and perform lighthearted divination spells to determine the identity of one’s future spouse.

    Halloween is now considered an American holiday, even though it is a bank holiday in Ireland. In many parts of Europe All Saints is still celebrated in its traditional Catholic form, in other places modern Halloween is celebrated side-by-side with All Saints, and in places like Mexico and South America it has become a separate and distinct holiday (that has retained a strong Catholic flavor). In many European and South American countries, as well as Mexico, All Saints is a public holiday.

    Writings about the pagan Roman feasts for the dead appear at least as early as the 1st century B.C., feasts for the Saints as early as the 4th century A.D., All Saints in Ireland as early as the 8th century, and Samhain as early as the 10th century.

  • AiyanaStories.weebly.com Visit! says:
  • blue eyed girl says:

    they believed that the dead came back to life that day do they dressed up like them so that the dead woudn’t attack them

  • KNOWBIBLE says:

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