Halloween II

(Collector's Edition) (1981) Jamie Lee Curtis

Read more
image01

Halloween

(Two-Disc Special Edition) (2007) Malcolm McDowell

Read more
image01

DreamWorks Halloween

Double Pack (Scared Shrekless / Monsters vs Aliens: Mutant Pumpkins From Outer Space)

Read more
image01

History of Halloween

The Haunted History of Halloween (History Channel) (A&E DVD Archives) (2005)

Read more
image01

Return to Halloweentown

(Ultimate Secret Edition) (2006) Sara Paxton

Read more
image01

The Day After Halloween

(Katarina's Nightmare Theater) Sigrid Thornton

Read more
image01

SpongeBob SquarePants

Halloween (1999) Tom Kenny

Read more
image01

Halloween III

Season of the Witch (1982) Tom Atkins

Read more
image01

Playhouse Disney Halloween

(Just Say Boo/A Spookie Ookie Halloween) (1998) Cole Caplan

Read more
image01

Halloween

25 Years of Terror (2006) John Ottman

Read more
image01

My mom won’t let me apply for a job at a Halloween store because she thinks it’s satanic.Help me convince her?

I know Halloween is a pagan holiday, or that’s how it started, but really, the halloween store is mostly full of cute costumes with some scary things. Halloween is really fun and the people in the store get so into it, I think it would be a fun working environment, but she’s not letting me. Help?

6 Responses to My mom won’t let me apply for a job at a Halloween store because she thinks it’s satanic.Help me convince her?

  • Fiona says:

    Actually, Halloween isn’t a pagan holiday. Hallowe’en is short for All Hallows Even which means All Saints Eve. It is so-called because it is the eve before All Saints Day, a Christian (primarily Catholic) holiday to honor all the saints who do not have their own day dedicated to them. All Saints was established by Pope Boniface IV in 609 AD and then it was moved to November 1 in the 8th century by Pope Gregory III. November 2 is All Souls Day, which was also started by the Catholic Church, and is a day to pray for the souls in purgatory and attend a requiem mass. All Souls is the source of the idea that the dead return on Halloween. All Souls may have been influenced by the fact that most cultures had holidays to honor their ancestors, but that had nothing to do with Satanism.

    Samhain, in Ireland, did become mixed with All Saints Day, but even Samhain wasn’t satanic. It couldn’t have been since the Irish Celts didn’t have a being like Satan in their belief system. And although Samhain was a part of the Halloween that became popular in America, Halloween couldn’t have originated with Samhain for several reasons: There were feasts for the saints being held before Christianity came to Ireland in the 5th century. There are no written records suggesting that Samhain was an influence. All Saints always was, and still is, observed in non-Celtic areas. All Saints was originally held in May and, according the "Martyrology of Tallaght", in Ireland it was originally held in April.

    The idea of Satan being associated with Halloween comes from several sources and all of them are Christian: During medieval times parishoners would parade around the church dressed as angels, saints, and devils. During the Protestant Reformation many Protestants labeled All Saints/ All Souls customs as Satanic because they were Catholic or "papist". The fear of supernatural forces like fairies and witches on Halloween came from folk beliefs combined with Chrisitan belief. In modern times religious extremists have labled Halloween as Satanic based on false histories that cannot be supported with any facts whatsoever, combined with gullible hysteria. In the last few decades Hollywood has heavily influenced Halloween (especially haunted house attractions) and Hollywood is concerned with entertainment, not historical accuracy.

    TV and the Internet are *not* reliable sources of information on Halloween unless a person has already studied it and knows what to look for.

    Also, All Saints was brought to the Americas from France and Spain over a century before the Irish brought Hallowe’en. These beliefs mixed with native beliefs and resulted in holidays like Mexico’s Day of the Dead and the Odawa Ghost Supper in Michigan. Today, although Halloween still means "All Saints Eve" it has become so secular and "Americanized" that it has lost its original Christian flavor and become a holiday of pure fun.

  • PAMELA [: says:

    say they might give you a free costume for Halloween so that way you dont have to buy one [:

  • freedom fighter says:

    just ask her nicely, then why do we celebrate both christmas and easter?which both started out as pagan holidays. why can we celebrate those and not halloween.

  • Me says:

    Dont work there if your mom doesnt let you… or even if she would you shouldnt!! Halloween is not a good holiday!! always think of what would Jesus do?? do you think Jesus would work in a Halloween store?? He wouldnt!! i think you need to read the bible and accept Jesus as your Savior!! =D Good luck with that!!

  • greenshootuk says:

    You are mistaken. Hallowe’en did not start as a pagan holiday. Hallowe’en means the evening (e’en) before All Hallows. Hallows is old English for Holy or Saint so All Saint’s Eve. All Saints Day (Nov 1st) is an ancient Christian festival which began over 1000 years ago as a day to celebrate all the Saints who did not have a particular feast day.

    Its a Catholic thing which lead to it being attacked by Protestants during the reformation. In Protestant countries, the USA in particular , founded by puritans, the religious meaning was suppressed leaving only the various folk customs which had grown up around the festival – like dressing up as devils to be chased away by children.

    Some 19th century romantics looking for an explanation of the customs assumed, because Hallowe’en had been attacked by some Christians, it must be pagan and they invented all sorts of explanations which are nothing to do with the original festival.

    Hallowe’en is orignally part of a Christian festival celebrating the fact that many holy people have triumphed over evil . Remember that and party on.dude.

    PS Of course I suppose it could be the store she thinks is satanic, rather than Hallowe’en itself. Are the owners devil-worshippers or some such? Do they go in for human sacrifices? In that case, she has a point.

  • Ginscense says:

    Halloween is actually the combination of celebrations from three seperate cultures. The Celts, who lived 2,000 years ago celebrated their new year on November 1. The day marked the end of summer and the harvest and the beginning of the dark, cold winter, a time of year that was often associated with human death. Celts believed that on the night before the new year, the boundary between the worlds of the living and the dead became blurred. On the night of October 31, they celebrated Samhain, when it was believed that the ghosts of the dead returned to earth. In addition to causing trouble and damaging crops, Celts thought that the presence of otherworldly spirits made it easier for the Druids (Celtic Priests) to make predictions about the future. For a people entirely dependent on the volatile natural world, these prophecies were an important source of comfort and direction during the long, dark winter. To commemerate the event, Druids built huge sacred bonfires, where people gathered to burn crops and animals as sacrifices to the Celtic deities. During the celebration the celts wore costumes and attempted to tell each other’s ortunes. When the celebration was overm they re-lit their hearth fires, which they had extinguished earlier that evening, from the sacred bonfire to help protect them during the coming winter.

    By 43 A.D., Romans had conquered the majority of Celtic territory. In the course of the 400 years that they ruled the Celtic lands, two festivals of Roman origin were combined with the traditional Celtic celebration of Samhain. The first was Feralia, a day in late October when the Romans traditionally commemorated the passing of the dead. The second was a day to honor Pomona, the Roman goddess of fruit and trees. The symbol of Pomona is the apple and the incorporation of this celebration into Samhain probably explains the tradition of "bobbing" for apples that is practiced today on Halloween.

    By the 800s, the influence of Christianity had spread into Celtic lands. In the seventh century, Pope Boniface IV designated November 1 All Saints’ Day, a time to honor saints and martyrs. It is widely believed today that the pope was attempting to replace the Celtic festival of the dead with a related, but chirch-sanctioned holiday. The celebration wa also called All -hallows and the night before it, the night of Samhain, began to be called All-hallows Eve and, eventually, Halloween. Even later, 1000 A.D., the would make November 2 All Souls’ Day, a day to honor the dead. It was celebrated similarly to Samhain, with big bonfire, parades and dressing up in costumes.

    I found all this information from the History Channel. Now you can tell your mom that for 2000 years it has never been a satanic holiday. I’ve also included the link, so you can show your mom.

Halloween Books