Halloween II

(Collector's Edition) (1981) Jamie Lee Curtis

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Halloween

(Two-Disc Special Edition) (2007) Malcolm McDowell

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DreamWorks Halloween

Double Pack (Scared Shrekless / Monsters vs Aliens: Mutant Pumpkins From Outer Space)

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History of Halloween

The Haunted History of Halloween (History Channel) (A&E DVD Archives) (2005)

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Return to Halloweentown

(Ultimate Secret Edition) (2006) Sara Paxton

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The Day After Halloween

(Katarina's Nightmare Theater) Sigrid Thornton

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SpongeBob SquarePants

Halloween (1999) Tom Kenny

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Halloween III

Season of the Witch (1982) Tom Atkins

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Playhouse Disney Halloween

(Just Say Boo/A Spookie Ookie Halloween) (1998) Cole Caplan

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Halloween

25 Years of Terror (2006) John Ottman

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I want to ask about halloween…..?

why Halloween always identical with pumpkin???

3 Responses to I want to ask about halloween…..?

  • Fiona says:

    Pumpkins are indigenous to North America, so the carving of them for Halloween began in the U.S. and Canada.

    The history of the jack-o-lantern is one of the things I am currently researching as part of my Halloween studies. So let me begin with only what I have *personally* read, keeping in mind that I am very early in my study of this particular subject:

    So far, the earliest reference I have found to a vegetable, in this case a turnip, being carved and called a "jack o’ lantern" is from the year 1833 in an English magazine. The term jack o’ lantern was more commonly used as another name for the will-o-wisp, otherwise known as swamp gas or ignis fatuus. I have found the name jack o’ lantern (or some variation) used in this way as far back as the early 17th century. The oldest version of the story of Stingy Jack and the Devil I have found, so far, is from Ireland in the year 1836, but in this story the name is still in reference to ignis fatuus. Turnip lanterns were definitely used in Scotland, as is attested to in an 1815 Scottish story "The Cottage Fireside; or, The Parish Schoolmaster". Halloween came to North America with Scottish and Irish immigrants, so I believe, based on what I have found to date, that the claim of the custom of carving vegetables for Halloween being imported from Scotland and Ireland, then adapted to the North American pumpkin, is a possibility.

    Although All Saints Eve existed, and still does, as a mostly Catholic celebration in many other parts of Europe, the Irish/Scottish secular Halloween lost its Catholic character and the majority of its Catholic traditions (its connection to death, and its name in English, are its primary Christian holdovers).

    The study of folkloric traditions and the recording of such customs didn’t start to become popular or be taken really seriously until the 18th century. There are plenty of records from before that, of course, but the number of these types of accounts soars in the 18th century, so a custom could have existed long before it was recorded on paper.

    I also read the Medieval texts concerning Samhain and have never found anything that even implies that the ancient Celts carved any kind of lanterns for Samhain. Samhain’s connection to Halloween is solidly established in history, but most of what is *popularly* believed to have been part of Samhain is not correct. The ancient Celts and Druids didn’t trick or treat, or wear costumes, or carve jack-o-lanterns, etc.

    Also, Halloween is in some ways a harvest festival and pumpkins are one of the fruits of the harvest. Pumpkin pie has long been associated with autumn.

    EDIT: I found a reference to pumpkins being carved as jack o’ lanterns for Halloween dated 1810, but the way it is listed I have not yet been able to confirm that the date is correct.

  • Steve says:

    It’s related to an ancient Celtic custom. During their festival that took place every year after the harvest and before winter, people would carve out a face on different large vegetables or gourds. It didn’t start with pumpkins however. I believe the most common one to start with was a turnip. They would take this carved-out vegetable and put a candle in it. Then they would carry it around from house to house on festival night and refer to it as their "demon" or "familiar". They would ask for food or drink and play tricks on people who refused them. These carved-out gourds became know as Jack ‘o the Lantern. Eventually, the pumpkin was selected as the best gourd to use for this purpose.

  • greenshootuk says:

    It’s an American tradition. Making lanterns out of carved vegetables has been a general thing for many centuries, particularly around Europe. It gives your candle some shelter from the wind and it is easy to carve the veg into amusing shapes. There is no historical evidence of them being associated with All Hallows Eve (Hallowe’en) until the 19th century. As with most folk customs, the reason behind them is doubtful though obviously pumpkins are in season and make excellent lanterns.

    Using lights at the All Saints festival goes back to the European custom of celebrating the lives of Saints on Nov 1 and commemorating our dead on Nov 2. In many countries, mainly catholic ones, people would visit the family cemetery and place candles or lanterns by the graves. In the protestant USA, this catholic custom would have been kept away from churches so may explain why the lamps are now a folk custom – and disliked by some fundamentalists..

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