Halloween II

(Collector's Edition) (1981) Jamie Lee Curtis

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Halloween

(Two-Disc Special Edition) (2007) Malcolm McDowell

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DreamWorks Halloween

Double Pack (Scared Shrekless / Monsters vs Aliens: Mutant Pumpkins From Outer Space)

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History of Halloween

The Haunted History of Halloween (History Channel) (A&E DVD Archives) (2005)

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Return to Halloweentown

(Ultimate Secret Edition) (2006) Sara Paxton

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The Day After Halloween

(Katarina's Nightmare Theater) Sigrid Thornton

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SpongeBob SquarePants

Halloween (1999) Tom Kenny

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Halloween III

Season of the Witch (1982) Tom Atkins

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Playhouse Disney Halloween

(Just Say Boo/A Spookie Ookie Halloween) (1998) Cole Caplan

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Halloween

25 Years of Terror (2006) John Ottman

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How do you remember loved ones that have passed away on Halloween?

I have lost a few loved ones this year,how do I remember them on Halloween and say goodbye to the mourning.My mum,dad and sister was killed in february and its time to start to move on with my one life.

8 Responses to How do you remember loved ones that have passed away on Halloween?

  • Chances68 says:

    When we sit down to our Samhain feast (dinner), we set an extra plate, and serve a little of each sort of food (for you who have lost so many, so dear to you, I would perhaps make a bit of their favorite dishes, and serve them on this plate). Then, as we eat, we remember them, talking about the impact they had on our lives and the good things they did, and sometimes the silly or even foolish things, as well. It’s a sort of mini-wake for them, minus the casket. Sometimes, this remembrance brings on tears, and sometimes laughter. We often bring photographs or mementos of our dear departed with us to the table, and we show them around as we eat, too.

    After the feast, the plate we served for the spirits of the departed is set on the hay bale outside the front door, and we go into the back yard, light the fire, and dance and sing, and write our New Years Resolutions on flash paper and burn them in the cauldron.

    Symbolically, putting the plate outside the front door and going into the back yard is all about moving on. Wishing the spirits of the departed well, and promising to remember them, but moving on and getting on with life. That’s why we then dance and sing. We also do ritual before it gets too late, and we ask the Gods to watch over our departed while they are on their journeys. After ritual (and after the younger kids are in bed) we drink a litle mead and play games, and often go to bed early for some post-ritual sacred sex, which is also a part of moving on. What better way to dispel death than sex?

    Hope I didn’t shock you. My condolences on your loss. Bright blessings!

  • Labgrrl says:

    We light an incense stick in each one’s name and let it burn out.

    …Outside, preferably.

  • SuzyQ says:

    I must say, my friend……………..halloween would NOT be my holiday of choice to ‘remember my family members’……………….I have chosen Thanksgiving – not only because my mother died 2 years ago this coming one – but because I can be ‘thankful’ that the Lord allowed me to have Christian parents………….that I was raised in a loving home……….and that I’ll see them again in heaven, one day……………

    God Bless…………………

  • 123456789 says:

    my grandad died 20 years ago on haloween

  • Basement Cat, reincarnated again says:

    drinking and possibly some weed

  • Kit >^..^< says:

    I didn’t know I should remember them on halloween. I do remember them during the year when I start to miss them. But halloween at my house is a fun day.

  • Rebecca L says:

    My sister died on November 1st (and she actually overdosed herself on Halloween) so I usually take some time during the day to remember her. I tend to have my remembrances for my dead loved ones on the anniversaries of their death. Usually, I simply remember them, cry a little if I’m feeling melancholy, and talk to God about them. I think it’s best to deal with your grief as it comes rather than waiting for a specific day to mourn or trying to move on too soon. If you feel ready to "go on with your life" you probably are, but be aware that you’ll still miss them. Something that they would have liked, or a person you see on the street, or the smell of their favorite food, will bring back their memory. Just let yourself have a mini-grief moment and it will be better quicker, in my opinion. I’m sorry for your loss.

  • Wren says:

    I am very sorry to hear of your loss. Each year at Samhain we honor those that have passed by lighting a candle for each and place in by their picture, or even a favorite object. We too have a feast, in which we set a place for the departed, and remember them then place the dish outside. Personally, if it is the year the loved one has past I always take them time to meditate then write a letter to them telling them anything I felt left unsaid. Afterward I burn it in the fire at the end of the evening after ritual. My family often camps at Samhain, so we typically will drum and dance late into the night. There is no really right way to say goodbye. It is whatever you feel comfortable with. I wish you the best.

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