Halloween II

(Collector's Edition) (1981) Jamie Lee Curtis

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Halloween

(Two-Disc Special Edition) (2007) Malcolm McDowell

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DreamWorks Halloween

Double Pack (Scared Shrekless / Monsters vs Aliens: Mutant Pumpkins From Outer Space)

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History of Halloween

The Haunted History of Halloween (History Channel) (A&E DVD Archives) (2005)

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Return to Halloweentown

(Ultimate Secret Edition) (2006) Sara Paxton

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The Day After Halloween

(Katarina's Nightmare Theater) Sigrid Thornton

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SpongeBob SquarePants

Halloween (1999) Tom Kenny

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Halloween III

Season of the Witch (1982) Tom Atkins

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Playhouse Disney Halloween

(Just Say Boo/A Spookie Ookie Halloween) (1998) Cole Caplan

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Halloween

25 Years of Terror (2006) John Ottman

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How do I save my tomato plant?

We just had a storm, and one of my big beef tomato plants toppled over. The cage is bent, and many of the branches are broken. A lot of tomatos fell to the ground. The tomatos are all different sizes. None of them, not even the largest of them has any red on it. Is there a way to save them? Will any of them ripen without being on the plant? Right now I have about 20 of them that I don’t know what to do with.

3 Responses to How do I save my tomato plant?

  • Lynn says:

    Stick a big pole as close to the plant as you can get it. Have some pipe-cleaners in easy reach. Tie up plant with pipe cleaners – tight enough that they don’t fall down, but loose enough to let the plant keep growing without strangling it. Make sure you especially tie around the breaks, much like a splint for broken bones. Just because branches and stems break, doesn’t always mean the plant is dead. They can bend to the point where they have a hard angle right into the stem still, once tied up again, it recovers. Not always but sometimes.

    Then remove branches that simply fell off. Nothing you can do there, but save your green tomatoes. And then you can do one of two things with the green tomatoes – keep them in a cardboard box with newspaper separating them in a cool place, and keep your eyes on them to see when they turn red. (We take our green tomatoes off when the first frost is coming – usually around Halloween – always have homegrown red tomatoes for Thanksgiving, and once had them for Christmas.) Or make pickled tomatoes out of those green tomatoes.

    Here’s my salt-free, sugar-free pickled green tomato recipe (which includes lots of alternatives, including not sweet dilled pickled tomatoes.) http://www.gather.com/viewArticle.action?articleId=281474978751104

    A storm doesn’t always mean everything-went-bad. It usually doesn’t mean that.

  • dukesmom says:

    Leave them on the counter in your kitchen and they will ripen. It will take a few days but they will. Try to put the plant back together in the cage and hopefully it will be ok with the rest of the tomatoes. Good luck!

  • ranger_co_1_75 says:

    Stand the tomato cage back up straight and secure it with more stakes.

    You can do three things with the green tomato’s that fell off. Let them sit on the counter until ripe. Bar B Q the small ones on the grill until they are tender. Slice the green tomato, sprinkle lightly with salt, roll in flour and fry them in oil until tender.

    Nothing like the sweet/tart flavor of fried green tomato’s.

Halloween Books