Halloween II

(Collector's Edition) (1981) Jamie Lee Curtis

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Halloween

(Two-Disc Special Edition) (2007) Malcolm McDowell

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DreamWorks Halloween

Double Pack (Scared Shrekless / Monsters vs Aliens: Mutant Pumpkins From Outer Space)

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History of Halloween

The Haunted History of Halloween (History Channel) (A&E DVD Archives) (2005)

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Return to Halloweentown

(Ultimate Secret Edition) (2006) Sara Paxton

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The Day After Halloween

(Katarina's Nightmare Theater) Sigrid Thornton

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SpongeBob SquarePants

Halloween (1999) Tom Kenny

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Halloween III

Season of the Witch (1982) Tom Atkins

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Playhouse Disney Halloween

(Just Say Boo/A Spookie Ookie Halloween) (1998) Cole Caplan

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Halloween

25 Years of Terror (2006) John Ottman

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Has anyone ever followed up on a factual reference in a fictional novel?

For instance: In the book "Crooked Tree", by Robert C. Wilson, the main character comes across some 17th century accounts written by the Jesuits. I looked into this and sure enough these writings actually exist. I have used them in my studies of Halloween, and I have a fictional story to thank for my discovering them. "Crooked Tree" is a good scary book, by the way.
honduran – I’m sorry. I don’t understand what you are trying to convey.

3 Responses to Has anyone ever followed up on a factual reference in a fictional novel?

  • reader says:

    I have, actually. The earliest occasion I remember doing it was in high school when I was reading Another Roadside Attraction by Tom Robbins. I attended a boarding school on the grounds of a monastery and I was one of the few students who spent weekends there. The novel deals with things to do with the Vatican, and, though this was not a Catholic monkhood, there was a large theological library available. I went hunting and even though I did not find precisely what I was looking for I did find many other fascinating things. Since then novels have caused me to track down all sorts of things, from trying foods to researching history, to listening to music, just for starters. I never really thought about it this way but your question made me realize just how many ways what I read serves as a catalyst in my life. Great question, thanks for asking, and I will look up The Crooked Tree.

  • honduranhansens says:

    Some people don´t need to look something up, some people were raised around certain facts and know them because they are part of that person´s life. writing a book? Get the facts strait!

  • Dixie Woman says:

    Absolutely. Always have. Nowadays, though, with computers and info so easily accessed, even more so.

    One of the books I’m reading now is Love in the Time of Cholera by Gabriel García Márquez so I figured I might as well read up on the time period and the cholera epidemic.

    I’ve also tried recipes I’ve found in novels. One of my favorite ways to roast a chicken came from, I think, The First Deadly Sin by Lawrence Sanders.

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Halloween Books