Halloween II

(Collector's Edition) (1981) Jamie Lee Curtis

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Halloween

(Two-Disc Special Edition) (2007) Malcolm McDowell

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DreamWorks Halloween

Double Pack (Scared Shrekless / Monsters vs Aliens: Mutant Pumpkins From Outer Space)

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History of Halloween

The Haunted History of Halloween (History Channel) (A&E DVD Archives) (2005)

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Return to Halloweentown

(Ultimate Secret Edition) (2006) Sara Paxton

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The Day After Halloween

(Katarina's Nightmare Theater) Sigrid Thornton

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SpongeBob SquarePants

Halloween (1999) Tom Kenny

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Halloween III

Season of the Witch (1982) Tom Atkins

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Playhouse Disney Halloween

(Just Say Boo/A Spookie Ookie Halloween) (1998) Cole Caplan

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Halloween

25 Years of Terror (2006) John Ottman

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Halloween traditions-What are the traditions of Halloween and how did they come to America?

Happy Early Halloween everyone.

3 Responses to Halloween traditions-What are the traditions of Halloween and how did they come to America?

  • Fiona says:

    Halloween is short for All Hallows Even which means All Saints Eve. It is the eve before All Saints Day, a Catholic day to honor all the saints who do not already have a feast day of their own. All Saints Day was originally celebrated on May 13, but it was moved to November 1 in the 8th century. In 998 A.D. All Souls Day was added as a day to pray for the souls in purgatory. Folk customs surrounding All Souls are the origin of the belief that the dead come back on Halloween. This is well documented church history.

    Not so well documented is the influence Samhain had on Halloween in Ireland. The evidence for Samhain (and its relationship to Halloween) is not very plentiful, but it does exist. It would take more room than is available here to list all the things people believe about Samhain that are not supported by evidence, so I will concentrate on what we DO know about Samhain and its connection to Halloween:
    1. ‘Samhain’ is the Irish word for the month of November, and the word is still in use in Ireland today.
    2. Samhain is mentioned frequently in the medeival Irish sagas as a day of great importance. It was a day of feasting, games, drinking, great battles, heroic feats and interaction between mortals and the realm of the fairies. Although the sagas are fiction, it is unlikely that a holiday that never existed would feature so prominently in these stories.
    3. The other three quarter days have long been celebrated, and two of them rededicated as Christian feast days, so it makes sense that Samhain was celebrated too. Also Bealtaine and Lúnasa are the Irish names for May and August.
    4. In Ireland the customs that are associated with Halloween are the same as the ones mentioned in the sagas as being part of Samhain: divination, partying, the belief that the fairies mingle with humans on this night.

    Although the Irish version of Halloween is the one that was eventually adopted in the United States, when it was brought over in the nineteenth century, All Saints and All Souls celebrations in the Americas can be traced back to the Spanish conquistadors, and the seventeenth century when the Jesuits brought the celebrations to the Native Americans. Remnants of these feast days can be seen today in Mexico’s Day of the Dead, the Zuni celebration of ahoppa awan tewa (the dead their day) and other native celebrations.

    In the nineteenth century, vast numbers of Irish, and to a lesser extent Scottish, immigrants settled in the United States and brought their Halloween customs with them. Unlike the more solemn, purely Catholic observance of All Saints/All Souls Day typical in continental Europe, the Irish version was more of a fun harvest festival in nature. Victorian-era Americans quickly adopted this holiday as an excuse to throw parties, send greeting cards, and perform lighthearted divination spells to determine the identity of one’s future spouse.

    In the twentieth century Halloween moved out of people’s homes and into the public. First with pranks and vandalism perpetrated by children, then later with civic celebrations such as trick-or-treat, community parties and parades.

    Today Halloween is considered an American holiday and some areas of Europe are adopting the American version of the holiday.

    SOURCES:
    http://books.google.com/books?id=rO2zYYUMWn4C&pg=PA495&lpg=PA495&dq=zuni+ahoppa+awan+tewa+&source=web&ots=6XlVdxQHHA&sig=CFMsXN9gz0YmmyCh0reeKyzX5YU&hl=en#PPA495,M1
    http://books.google.com/books?id=rJ81AAAAIAAJ&pg=PA125&dq=the+jesuit+relations+all+saints+day
    http://books.google.com/books?id=L3gqAAAAMAAJ&pg=PA789&dq=all+saints+day
    http://books.google.com/books?id=bGdbHI9-8e8C&pg=PA29&dq=all+souls+day+catholic+encyclopedia
    http://books.google.com/books?id=t-P24jQyfP0C&pg=PA374&dq=stations+of+the+sun+all+souls+day&sig=t7yOLQgYzdhYXiYeW-keqEY30pU#PPA371,M1
    http://books.google.com/books?id=q_kHAAAACAAJ&dq=the+halloween+encyclopedia
    http://books.google.com/books?id=KhvNsR59WekC&pg=PA162&dq=jack+santino+halloween&sig=3Z7WVdG-tXw21ldHm52CFjKp9QQ#PPA145,M1
    http://www.luminarium.org/mythology/ireland/cuchulainnsick.htm
    http://tinyurl.com/2la68w

  • G-grrrl. says:

    This is a BIG question. Halloween has routes in pagan history and was originally called "Samhain", which was a harvest type celebration that took place at the end of the Autumn.

    As years passed traditions changed, some new traditions were added, some old ones taken away. To really learn about these traditions I would recommend reading "Halloween customs" a book by Silver Ravenwolf.

  • Tony.Am says:

    Many answer can find in SE, I also found on website that cool and make me understand more about Halloween. Their topic is "History of Halloween".

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