Halloween II

(Collector's Edition) (1981) Jamie Lee Curtis

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Halloween

(Two-Disc Special Edition) (2007) Malcolm McDowell

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DreamWorks Halloween

Double Pack (Scared Shrekless / Monsters vs Aliens: Mutant Pumpkins From Outer Space)

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History of Halloween

The Haunted History of Halloween (History Channel) (A&E DVD Archives) (2005)

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Return to Halloweentown

(Ultimate Secret Edition) (2006) Sara Paxton

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The Day After Halloween

(Katarina's Nightmare Theater) Sigrid Thornton

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SpongeBob SquarePants

Halloween (1999) Tom Kenny

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Halloween III

Season of the Witch (1982) Tom Atkins

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Playhouse Disney Halloween

(Just Say Boo/A Spookie Ookie Halloween) (1998) Cole Caplan

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Halloween

25 Years of Terror (2006) John Ottman

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Can someone please tell me the history of Halloween?

Just wondering cuz I just don’t get why kids gotta go door to door and ask for candy and get all dressed up I just think its pointless and dumb.
I didn’t know where to put it soo thats why its in here soooorry.

9 Responses to Can someone please tell me the history of Halloween?

  • vegeta94_73 says:

    History of Halloween, like any other festival’s history is inspired through traditions that have transpired through ages from one generation to another. We follow them mostly as did our dads and grandpas. And as this process goes on, much of their originality get distorted with newer additions and alterations. It happens so gradually, spanning over so many ages, that we hardly come to know about these distortions. At one point of time it leaves us puzzled, with its multicolored faces. Digging into its history helps sieve out the facts from the fantasies which caught us unaware. Yet, doubts still lurk deep in our soul, especially when the reality differs from what has taken a deep seated root into our beliefs. The history of Halloween Day, as culled from the net, is being depicted here in this light. This is to help out those who are interested in washing off the superficial hues to reach the core and know things as they truly are. ‘Trick or treat’ may be an innocent fun to relish on the Halloween Day. But just think about a bunch of frightening fantasies and the scary stories featuring ghosts, witches, monsters, evils, elves and animal sacrifices associated with it. They are no more innocent. Are these stories a myth or there is a blend of some reality? Come and plunge into the halloween history to unfurl yourself the age-old veil of mysticism draped around it.

    Behind the name… Halloween, or the Hallow E’en as they call it in Ireland , means All Hallows Eve, or the night before the ‘All Hallows’, also called ‘All Hallowmas’, or ‘All Saints’, or ‘All Souls’ Day, observed on November 1. In old English the word ‘Hallow’ meant ‘sanctify’. Roman Catholics, Episcopalians and Lutherians used to observe All Hallows Day to honor all Saints in heaven, known or unknown. They used to consider it with all solemnity as one of the most significant observances of the Church year. And Catholics, all and sundry, was obliged to attend Mass. The Romans observed the holiday of Feralia, intended to give rest and peace to the departed. Participants made sacrifices in honor of the dead, offered up prayers for them, and made oblations to them. The festival was celebrated on February 21, the end of the Roman year. In the 7th century, Pope Boniface IV introduced All Saints’ Day to replace the pagan festival of the dead. It was observed on May 13. Later, Gregory III changed the date to November 1. The Greek Orthodox Church observes it on the first Sunday after Pentecost. Despite this connection with the Roman Church, the American version of Halloween Day celebration owes its origin to the ancient (pre-Christian) Druidic fire festival called "Samhain", celebrated by the Celts in Scotland, Wales and Ireland. Samhain is pronounced "sow-in", with "sow" rhyming with cow. In Ireland the festival was known as Samhein, or La Samon, the Feast of the Sun. In Scotland, the celebration was known as Hallowe’en. In Welsh it’s Nos Galen-gaeof (that is, the Night of the Winter Calends. According to the Irish English dictionary published by the Irish Texts Society: "Samhain, All Hallowtide, the feast of the dead in Pagan and Christian times, signalizing the close of harvest and the initiation of the winter season, lasting till May, during which troops (esp. the Fiann) were quartered. Faeries were imagined as particularly active at this season. From it the half year is reckoned. also called Feile Moingfinne (Snow Goddess).(1) The Scottish Gaelis Dictionary defines it as "Hallowtide. The Feast of All Soula. Sam + Fuin = end of summer."(2) Contrary to the information published by many organizations, there is no archaeological or literary evidence to indicate that Samhain was a deity. The Celtic Gods of the dead were Gwynn ap Nudd for the British, and Arawn for the Welsh. The Irish did not have a "lord of death" as such. Thus most of the customs connected with the Day are remnants of the ancient religious beliefs and rituals, first of the Druids and then transcended amongst the Roman Christians who conquered them.

    I agree with you. I do not see the point in Halloween!

  • paddy says:

    the irish started it!
    yer welcome for it, ’cause we’re glad to share it

  • Blonde at Heart says:

    Why is this in family & relationships? and sorry I have no idea

  • BARRIE says:

    Any old excuse for a rave up!

  • Confused & Young says:

    it is an extremely long story. i can’t get into detail (there’s no time) but i can say, that there is nothing innocent about the holiday. you should really do some research on it on the web. you’ll be surprised by what you find out.

  • amandaped25 says:

    well i know , back then, in the mexican culture they would dress up as their favorite ghosts or goblins and go to their loved ones grave and have a celebration. They believed on this night their dead loved ones raised from the dead. So that would explain the ghost and goblins dress ups for kids. As for teh door to door thing….i think it’s just something they came up with back then for kids to have a special holiday.

  • Track says:

    Like all holidays celebrated by Christians (it would have looked too obvious if they had stolen the jewish bible AND the jewish holidays), Halloween is derived from Pagen Cermonies. Halloween was once the time of the Pagen new years. The christians mocked the Pagens and said that new years is 3 months away and somehow Halloween came to be.

    I suggest u watch the Simpsons halloween specials, some have interesting plot lines wich explain Halloween. I forget wich one exactly is best.

  • opium_moon says:
  • saintly_angeline says:

    As Halloween approaches us frighteningly fast, preparations are beginning for many activities, celebrations and festivities. But amid all the exhilarating Halloween frenzy that we have so long been accustomed to, we often forget the true meaning behind why we are really celebrating.

    There is indeed a meaningful history, for at the roots of this ancient holiday are 2000 years of European-bred traditions, customs and rituals that evolved into Halloween as we know it today. The actual concept of Halloween is derived from an early Celtic holiday called Samhein (pronounced sow-in) that took place at the beginning of the winter season on Oct. 31. This day marked the end of summer and the end of food abundance and plant vitality for farmers.

    Spirits of the dead were believed to roam freely. On the day known as "The Day of the Dead," living relatives would help their dead loved ones complete a safe journey to the afterlife. People would paint or carve scary faces on gourds and turnips and disguise themselves in outlandish costumes to scare away the evil spirits that were also thought to be wandering the earth that night.

    The Catholic Church, angered by these pagan practices, sought to eliminate them. Pope Gregory decided to declare a new festival of religious observance called All Saint’s Day, a day in which every saint would be honored. A few hundred years down the line, its date was changed so that it would fall on the same day as Samhein.

    As part of the custom of All Saints Day, people would dress up in a costume that represented a saint, and young men would go door-to-door begging for food to feed the town’s poor. (Reason of today’s kids going door to door for candy)As the years went by, the customs of Samhein and All Saints Day began to merge and were no longer considered two separate festivals, but rather one joint holiday called All Hollow’s Day.

    When the Irish population began immigrating to America in the mid-1800s, they brought with them the many European customs of All Hollow’s Day. These customs combined with an existing American tradition called "Autumn’s Play." "Autumn’s Play" is a celebration in which people gather to sing, feast, light bonfires and watch children parade in costume.

    These two festivals shaped present-day Halloween and all of the spooky phenomena that we enjoy today.

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